Start with Natural

Simply focusing on unrefined food is the key to achieving nutritional health From a clinicians point of view, it is already clear that differing amounts of the macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, and fats) affect individuals differently, and while there are best-practice guidelines for various desired outcomes, there is a large degree of individuality between the prescription for individuals. This variability has been termed by practitioners’ biochemical individuality, metabolic typing or other terms. However, there is, at this point in time, no accepted way to determine the macronutrient ‘tolerance’ of an individual, except in those cases where a specific diet benefits a disease or disorder (such as a ketogenic diet for epilepsy).  Carbohydrate is not essential,1 and yet can be extremely beneficial but the variability in any individual’s benefits from eating greater or lesser amounts of carbohydrate makes its prescription somewhat problematic. Due to its nature as an almost exclusively fuel-providing substrate, it is evident that carbohydrate intake should mostly be determined by two major factors: The activity level of the individual (latent activity from habits and nervous and ‘constitutional’ behaviours, work-type, and exercise intensity, frequency and volume)The metabolic tolerance to carbohydrate—which is likely to be dependent on genetic predisposition, and to exercise/activity and to dietary and medical history, especially where these factors may contribute to a tendency towards insulin resistance. The difficult part for anyone is to try to figure out their unique tolerance to the macronutrients. One could begin by counting calories and macronutrients and adjusting these to attempt to…