Issue #5 The Carb-Appropriate Review

Issue 5 | Volume 1 | October 2019 In this issue: This month we have a special ‘Food Fight’ issue that focusses on the low-carb vs high-carb debate! Feature article Should you choose high or low-carb? There is a seemingly endless debate between advocates of high and low-carb diets. In this article, Cliff Harvey PhD delves into the research, including that if he and his team, to show you what the science says about who is best suited to higher- or lower-carb diets. Read the article here In the literature What is ‘benevolent pseudo-diabetes’? There has been some suggestion that low-carb and keto diets can cause insulin resistance and this is supported by some animal studies and human clinical findings. However, low-carb also treats metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. So, what’s going on here? Could the insulin resistance observed in studies actually be of benefit to people following a low-carb diet? Read the article here Another nail in the saturated fat & heart disease hypothesis? The idea that total fat intake and saturated fat in the diet are linked to heart disease persists. Many studies and reviews of the literature have refuted this hypothesis and in this review of a recent meta-analysis, Cliff examines the faltering evidence for the link between saturated fat and heart disease. Read the article here The ‘big fat debate’ over low-carb or low-fat diets and diabetes Recent media articles have highlighted the debate between low-carb and low-fat diets for treating diabetes. In this article, Cliff…

Start with Natural

Simply focusing on unrefined food is the key to achieving nutritional health From a clinicians point of view, it is already clear that differing amounts of the macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, and fats) affect individuals differently, and while there are best-practice guidelines for various desired outcomes, there is a large degree of individuality between the prescription for individuals. This variability has been termed by practitioners’ biochemical individuality, metabolic typing or other terms. However, there is, at this point in time, no accepted way to determine the macronutrient ‘tolerance’ of an individual, except in those cases where a specific diet benefits a disease or disorder (such as a ketogenic diet for epilepsy).  Carbohydrate is not essential,1 and yet can be extremely beneficial but the variability in any individual’s benefits from eating greater or lesser amounts of carbohydrate makes its prescription somewhat problematic. Due to its nature as an almost exclusively fuel-providing substrate, it is evident that carbohydrate intake should mostly be determined by two major factors: The activity level of the individual (latent activity from habits and nervous and ‘constitutional’ behaviours, work-type, and exercise intensity, frequency and volume)The metabolic tolerance to carbohydrate—which is likely to be dependent on genetic predisposition, and to exercise/activity and to dietary and medical history, especially where these factors may contribute to a tendency towards insulin resistance. The difficult part for anyone is to try to figure out their unique tolerance to the macronutrients. One could begin by counting calories and macronutrients and adjusting these to attempt to…

Evolution, Anthropology and Human Nutrition

It is clear that humans have only eaten an appreciable amount of the very high-carbohydrate foods (in particular sugar, and ultra-refined grains) for a fairly short time in their overall development. Now before anyone accuses me of being some crazy ‘Paleo guy’ remember that I started consulting in the nutrition field before Paleo was ‘cool’….way back in the late 1990s. But, as a rational scientist it does make sense to me, to look at what humans have eaten over their many tens of thousands of years of development and what the remaining free-living hunter-gatherer populations still eat, to at least provide some extra context to what we should be doing now. For many thousands of years’ humans survived as hunter-gatherers and it is only in the past several thousand (an evolutionary ‘blink of the eye’) that we have shifted to a diet in which grain-based and high-sugar foods dominate our food supply. It is even more recently that we began to eat the vast amounts of highly processed and ultra-refined foods that now make up the bulk of the modern diet. The agrarian shift reduced health of our ancestors At the time of the invention and rapid uptake of agriculture around 10,000 years ago, people’s height decreased and health suffered.1 While we tend to think that having an abundant supply of food would preserve health and performance the opposite appears to have taken place. What it instead provided food security. There are undoubted benefits to this, but the higher-grain diets…

Michelle Yandle – Empowered Eating

The Carb-Appropriate Podcast Ep.17 In this episode of the podcast, I chat with my good buddy Michelle Yandle. Michelle is a nutrition and health coach focused on empowered patterns of eating and lifestyle. You can find out more about Michelle at https://www.michelleyandle.com/ and her latest book at AMAZON The WELLFED event is happening in New Plymouth on the 26th of October 2019. Listeners of the podcast can get a discount on tickets by using code HPNDISCOUNT Michelle Yandle – The Carb-Appropriate Podcast Ep.17 LIVE