Can You Be ‘Healthy at Every Size’?

Key Findings HAES results in significant and lasting benefits to self-esteem, body image, hunger cues, and cognitive restraint.These results are similar to social support programsHAES does not result in substantive benefits to physical health.A combined approach, focused on psycho-social and physical indicators of health is likely to the best approach. Traditional weight loss methods are based primarily on a medical model which treats obesity as a disease requiring diet, exercise, or pharmaceutical intervention. Conversely, the increasingly popular ‘Health At Every Size’ (HAES) movement believes that “individuals who are overweight and obese want to exercise and eat healthy foods, and they are capable of doing so when barriers are removed”.1 The Health At Every Size® Principles are: Weight Inclusivity: Accept and respect the inherent diversity of body shapes and sizes and reject the idealizing or pathologising of specific weights.Health Enhancement: Support health policies that improve and equalize access to information and services, and personal practices that improve human well-being, including attention to individual physical, economic, social, spiritual, emotional, and other needs.Respectful Care: Acknowledge our biases, and work to end weight discrimination, weight stigma, and weight bias. Provide information and services from an understanding that socio-economic status, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, and other identities impact weight stigma and support environments that address these inequities.Eating for Well-being: Promote flexible, individualized eating based on hunger, satiety, nutritional needs, and pleasure, rather than any externally regulated eating plan focused on weight control.Life-Enhancing Movement: Support physical activities that allow people of all sizes, abilities, and interests to…

Do Low-Carbohydrate Diets Negatively Affect Female Hormone Balance?

Key Findings Carbohydrate restriction does not result in alterations of ovulation, menses, or other indicators of women’s hormonal health. Low-carbohydrate diets have demonstrated positive benefits to women’s hormonal health. Extreme calorie restriction is likely to affect women’s hormonal balance and health. Those women who are leaner and exercise more are at greater risk of negative effects from excessive or prolonged energy restriction. A common claim currently doing the rounds is that a low-carb or keto-diet will negatively affect either ‘female hormone balance’, menstrual cycles, or ovulation. It is claimed that there is a minimum amount of carbohydrate (i.e. 200 g per day) required to preserve hormone status and ovulation, along with other indicators of hormonal health. Does This Claim Stack Up? There is no evidence that 200 g per day is required to preserve markers of female hormone balance. In fact, the most commonly cited study to support the idea that there is a minimum requirement for carbohydrate showed no such thing. Read more and listen to the audio below Luteinizing Hormone Pulsatility Is Disrupted at a Threshold of Energy Availability in Regularly Menstruating Women Anna Loucks, Jean Thuma The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 88, Issue 1, 1 January 2003, Pages 297–311, https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2002-020369 Abstract To investigate the dependence of LH pulsatility on energy availability (dietary energy intake minus exercise energy expenditure), we measured LH pulsatility after manipulating the energy availability of 29 regularly menstruating, habitually sedentary, young women of normal body composition for 5 days in the early…