Gypsy: What’s in a Name?

Gypsy [noun]: A member of a traditionally itinerant people who originated in northern India and now live chiefly in south and southwest Asia, Europe, and North America: Romani, Rom, Romany What’s a Gypsy? A Gypsy is a Romani person. The term is now also often used in the United Kingdom to describe several of the other ethnic traveller groups, Scottish (Narkin) and Irish (Pavee) travellers. But isn’t a Gypsy anyone who travels? Not really. Originally, the term gypsy was applied only to Romani people. The word originates from ‘Egyptian’. Because Romani people are historically dark (although now many Rom in Western Europe are ostensibly ‘white’) they were thought to be from Egypt and hence, were called Egyptians, which became shortened to ‘Gyptian’ and then to Gypsy. But now it means something different, right? Yes and no. The word has now been taken to mean a free-spirited wanderer but there are many issues with this. This very modern derivation of the word only became a ‘thing’ as hippie counter-culture types began to use the term to describe a lifestyle. The problem with that derivation is that the lifestyle associated with the word gypsy is a fantastical, fetishized, and stereotypical association. So, to use ‘gypsy’ to describe a business, brand or lifestyle plays into these stereotypes and fetishizes a people. Black guys have big dicks, Native Americans have mystical powers, and gypsies are free-spirited wanderers without a care in the world… Um, no. Aren’t Gypsies free-spirited wanderers without a care in the world?…

Keto-flu, ketogenesis, and Carb-Tolerance: Part 2

A Summary of Our Research: How did people ‘feel’ on a keto diet? Very little research has been conducted on people’s subjective experiences of diet. The study of this is incredibly important because if we are to properly understand diet and prescribe, based on holistic effects, we need to know how people feel! Subjective perceptions of people on a keto-diet We analysed this in a qualitative study.  We identified our participants subjective mood and experiences related to the ketogenic diet from daily diary entries and focus group findings. Read more & listen to the audio below A summary of our keto research, part 2. Despite some initial challenges with the diet, especially gastrointestinal effects (mostly related to high levels of MCTs!), the overall perception of the diet was positive. There were appreciable benefits for wellbeing, mood, sleep, and sugar cravings reported, with negative experiences decreasing as participants adapted to the keto-diet.3 These findings suggested that the overall experience of a very-low-carb keto diet is positive, but varies markedly between individuals. The preceding studies suggested that increased ketonaemia might positively affect symptoms of carbohydrate withdrawal during keto-induction, and mood, but it is unclear whether diets differing in carbohydrate content and resulting in differing levels of ketonaemia would elicit similar effects. Ketosis and keto-flu in non-keto low-carb diets The final study of this collective body of work was a randomised clinical trial comparing a ketogenic diet, a low-carb diet and moderate-low-carb diet consisting of 5%, 15%, and 25% of total energy (TE)…